Argentine Prosecutor Who Accused President of Graft Found Dead – Businessweek

The Argentine prosecutor who last week
accused President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner of trying to
absolve Iranian officials from their involvement in the most
deadly terrorist attack in the nation’s history has been found
dead in his apartment.

Alberto Nisman’s body was discovered by his mother and a
police officer in the bathroom of his apartment last night
alongside a gun and the shell of a bullet, according to a
statement by the Security Ministry, which didn’t provide the
cause of death. Nisman was scheduled to present evidence of his
accusations against Fernandez at a lower house commission today.
He was 51, according to local media.

Nisman alleged that Fernandez and her Foreign Minister
Hector Timerman had sought to cover up an investigation he was
heading into the 1994 bombing of a Jewish community center that
left 85 people dead and hundreds injured. His mother and federal
police officers assigned to protect the prosecutor entered the
apartment after repeatedly trying to contact him.

Nisman’s death is being investigated by authorities,
according to the Security Ministry.

Argentine prosecutors in 2006 charged Iran and the
Hezbollah group with organizing the bombing and issued eight
arrest warrants, one of them for former President Ayatollah Ali Akbar Rafsanjani. Seven years later, Fernandez said she signed a
memorandum of understanding with the Iranians to set up a truth
commission into the bombing.

According to Nisman, the aim of the accord was for Iranian
officials to be taken off Interpol’s wanted list. In exchange,
Argentina would export grains and meat to Iran and receive oil.

Timerman said Jan. 15 that the accusations were “lies”
and accused Nisman of trying to stoke up sentiment against
Fernandez’s government during a year in which Argentines will
vote for a new president.

To contact the reporter on this story:
Charlie Devereux in Buenos Aires at
cdevereux3@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story:
Andre Soliani at
asoliani@bloomberg.net
Philip Sanders

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